Aquila string informations

  STRING Type   item numbers
       
  Nylgut strings:    
-- Nylgut plain -->> NG ...
-- Nylgut plain 2m -->> NGE ...
-- Nylgut wound -->> NGW ...
-- Nylgut wound DE-Typ -->> NGWDE ...
-- Empire Period Harp Bass Wound Strings -->> NGEH ...
-- Aoud strings arabic tuning -->> AQOA ...
-- Aoud strings türkish tuning -->> AQOT ...
-- Ukulele strings -->> AQ UKU ...
       
  gut strings:    
-- gut plain oiled -->> AQHT ...
-- gut plain half rectified -->> AQHR ...
-- "Venice" gut -->> AQV ...
-- loaded gut -->> AQC ...
-- wound gut -->>  
-- fretgut -->> BDA ...
    -->>  
-- Nylon plain -->> AQN ...
--      
  guitar strings    
-- classical guitar -->>  
-- romantic guitar -->>  

 

Umsponnene Darmsaiten

 

However, their use did not spread out very quickly for some decades: in fact the earliest iconographical evidence showing musical instruments strung with wound strings (Violin and Cello) date back to 1680. In Italy, a country renowned for its string production, the earliest evidence is from the year 1677.
According to Rousseau (Traité de la Viole, 1685) it was the Viola da Gamba player Sainte Colombe who first introduced them into France around 1675, but the most important English Lute and Viola da Gamba tutor, Thomas Mace\'s \"Musick\'s Monument\", in 1676 does not mention them at all. According to James Talbot\'s MS. (ca.1700) Lute, Violin and Bass-Violin bass strings are still the usual gut ones, namely Lyons, Catlines or the \"deep dark red\" Pistoys. Only in the early decades of the 18th century wound strings -both close or open wound (called, in 18th c. France, demi-filée)- got the upper hand of traditional gut strings, revolutionizing music making to our day.

- SILK WOUND STRINGS .

TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS AND FIELD OF APPLICATION We conceived our \"F\" (close wound), \"FD\" (open wound) in pure silver; \"A\" (close wound), \"AD\" (open wound) in silvered copper wire type-strings with the aim of recovering the typical materials and proportions of the wound strings in use in the 18th and 19th century (round wires, no silk between the metal wire and the gut-core): rather different from modern strings, as supported by historical sources and by measurements taken from original string fragments in museums.
This is our best answer to the needs of people who are seriously interested in the faithful reproduction of the musical repertories of the past.

Hereby we would also like to remind you to use our \"C\" type loaded gut strings when performing late 16th and hearly 17th century music; our \"FD\" and \"AD\" types on French 18th Century-repertoires (3rd D Violine; 4th Bass Viola da Gamba C); in the strictest respect to historical authenticity.
 

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Gitarrensaiten

INTRODUCTION

Until the mid-20th century the top three strings of the guitar were mounted exclusively in gut, a material that had been used for thousand of years and that combines excellent promptness of attack with brilliance of timbre - very different, in other words, from modern nylon strings. And until recently the typical sound quality of gut has been a constant point of reference for lute-makers, composers and performers alike. A fundamental aim of our research has therefore been to make a new synthetic product having the same acoustic properties as gut - but without its typical defects - (high cost, limited duration and high instability under varying climatic). Nylgut® has precisely these qualities: allowing one, on the one hand, to rediscover the sonorities familiar to the great 19th and 20th century masters; and guaranteeing, on the other, a stability of tuning higher even than that of the best gut and nylon strings.

Please notice

Just like gut, Nylgut® is liable to suffer from cutting edges. Before stringing the instrument do make sure the nut and bridge are free from sharp edges and the nut grooves not too deep and perfectly smooth. You can get rid of sharp edges with very fine grit sandpaper (600, for example) or the finest steelwool (000).

-The best sound quality develops when the strings have completely set, which may ordinarily take sometime. To achieve a stable intonation in just a few minutes you can repeatedly pinch each string at midlength with your fingers, pull it decidedly sideways and tune it up again. Stop when the string does not pull out of tune anymore.

CLASSICAL GUITAR SETS

ALCHEMIA

Set with two degrees of tension. The first three strings use monofilaments of rounded, polished Nylgut® \"synthetic gut\". Its features include promptness of attack, acoustic projection, excellent timbre and a truly remarkable stability of intonation, not to mention an admirable evenness of tone with the overspun basses. The basses have a multifilament core in a material of new conception (Nylgut® multifilament), specially wound with pure silver, that boasts high resistance to tensile stress and stability under varying climatic conditions. Using pure silver ensures the highest possible response in terms of timbre and volume, lower interference from finger noise and durability above the norm. The overspun strings have also been designed according to the principle - again absolutely new - of progressively increasing the dynamic performance of the bass register to compensate for the human ear\'s natural tendency to perceive lower frequencies less audibly.
 

Romantische Gitarren / Biedermaiergitarren

GUT & SILK 900 (1880-1946 performances)

Up to the middle of the 20th century, the only available strings for guitar were plain gut for the trebles and wound on silk core for the basses.
Their acoustical performance was quite different from that of modern stringings. The salient characteristics were a marked timbric presence, response and brightness typical of the thinner gut strings (certainly superior to plain nylon and in some respects closer to PVDF or carbon) while the basses, on the other hand, possessed an exquisitely vocal quality, i.e. not so bright as, and with less sustain than, modern wound on nylon strings and more fundamental heavy.
The Treble tension- profile is not true scaling (like in use in all of the modern guitar\'s sets): it is just ligthly scaling, like the standard of that time.
This set which is made with only one degree, of tension, riproposes excatly a historical assembling, tipycal of the period of Llobet and Tàrrega by using oily gut for trebles and wound basses, silver-copper covered on silk, as it was said by Pujol in the \"Escuela Razonada de la Guitarra\" of 1934.

Notice!
Gut is liable to suffer from cutting edges. Before stringing the instrument do make sure the nut and bridge are free from sharp edges and the nut grooves not too deep and perfectly smooth.
You can get rid of sharp edges with very fine grit sandpaper (600, for example) or the finest steelwool (000). The best sound quality develops when the strings have completely set, which may ordinarily take sometime. To achieve a stable intonation in just a few minutes you can repeatedly pinch each string at midlength with your fingers, pull it decidedly sideways and tune it up again. Stop when the string does not pull out of tune anymore.

AMBRA 900 (this is the syntetic version of the \'Gut & Silk 900 set)

Up to the middle of the 20th century, the only available strings for guitar were plain gut for the trebles and wound on silk core for the basses: their acoustical performance was quite different from that of modern stringings.
The salient characteristics were: a marked timbric presence, response and brightness typical of the gut strings (certainly superior to plain nylon and in some respects closer to PVDF or carbon) while the basses, on the other hand, possessed an exquisitely vocal quality, i.e. not so bright as, and with less sustain than, modern wound on nylon strings and more fundamental heavy.

Our Ambra set was developed keeping in mind this historical fact, in order to best re-create, by means of modern synthetic materials, the sound of Llobet and Tàrrega. This set was conceived for one grade of tension and cosists of Nylgut® - true synthetic gut, we are tempted to say - for the trebles, adopting the representative mean diameters as indicated by Pujol in his \"Escuela Razonada de la Guitarra\" from 1934 (less scaling tension than the modern gyuitar trebles), while for the basses (silvered copper wires wound on Nylgut® multifilament core) we tried to find the right balance between wire and core, which would recreate exactly the typical sound of the wound silk strings of the time.